10 Things you should know before visiting India for the first time

9 0

The explosion of colorful customs, an array of delightful traditions, a versatile terrain that changes almost every mile and a host of numerous activities to experience that aid spiritual well being; India is a wholesome sensory delight. Do the idyllic Himalayas, backwaters of God’s own country Kerala, the lifesize boulders of Hampi, or the free-spiritedness of Goa beckon you but you are not too sure how you’ll adjust? Fear not, we just prepared this list of ten tips for people planning to visit India for the first time!

Just drop all your expectations but prepare for culture shock

You might have traveled to many countries before and think you’ve seen everything but do not underestimate India’s ability to culture-shock the hell out of you. Visiting India for the first time is an assault on all senses. India’s glorious chaos and diverse contrasts will get under your skin and will turn your world upside down. This country is known for succeeding to frustrate even the most patient world travelers but it’s also the only one that will make you forgive all of its daily frustrations and keep craving for its vibrant soul.

Bu one cannot expect anything less from the world’s most culturally diverse country. India’s 1.3 billion people are squeezed into an area almost 4 times smaller than that of the US. These 1.3 billion people have 22 official languages but also more than 400 unofficial languages. Even though most people are Hindu, Hinduism itself has more than 3,000 casts and 15,000 sub-castes. This alone would be enough to bring any other country to the verge of a civil war in a matter of time but not India. Fascinating, isn’t it? This proves that…

We all can learn something from India

This might come surprising for some but yes, we can all learn a lot from India and you should come here with that mindset. Yes, the streets are dirty. Yes, you will see cows walking in the street. The traffic is horrible, the cities are overcrowded. Yes, there are a lot of poor and homeless people. But despite all of this and despite all of this diversity, people are happy. They’re genuinely happy regardless of their financial condition or their status. You will be welcomed warmly, whether you’re in one of the most expensive neighborhoods or in the slums of Delhi or Mumbai.

You’ll see some stunning landscapes, ancient religious sites, and important historic monuments. In fact, most people visit for this reason. WRONG! Don’t get me wrong, the above-mentioned places are stunning but you’ll find the real beauty of India in the faces, characters, and lives of the people you see every day.

It’s in these people that you’ll discover that India is not, as many people keep calling it, an ‘underdeveloped country’, but from a historical and cultural perspective, a highly developed one in an advanced state of decay. And that’s the mindset you should come here with rather than looking down on people.

With that being said let me try to give you some more practical tips. Let’s start with…

Planning the budget for your India trip

India is a cheap destination for travelers but it’s not free, so don’t make the mistake of underestimating your costs. If you stay at hostels (there are a lot of decent ones across the country) you’ll be paying around 5-6 dollars per night on average. If you eat in cheap restaurants, you can have a meal in $2 and if you eat three meals per day that means you’ll need around $12 per day or 4360 per month. But that’s just the basics. Always go shopping for groceries at the local vendor and not in big supermarkets. Local vendors are always cheaper because they don’t give receipts. No receipt= no tax= cheaper prices.

I’d double that cost if you’re traveling around and need to take care of your transportation too. You also might not find a hostel room so cheap everywhere you go. If you want to stay in a hotel with a separate room, you could get a decent one in around $20. Domestic flights are more affordable than ever but trains and buses run across the country and cost only a fraction of the price. You can also find some good deals on Yatra, Makemytrip, GoIbibo, and even Agoda.

Now, you might think eating street food might not be safe and you would rather go to a western restaurant. Let me tell you why you shouldn’t do that.

You’ll get sick anyway- don’t panic

No matter how strong you think your stomach is, at one point you’ll probably get the famous Delhi-belly. Don’t panic, that’s just India’s way of saying hi. It happens because your belly isn’t familiar with many of the local bacteria. This normally passes after a day or two. After that, you get used to the local food and the surrounding.

Now, if I were to visit India for the first time again, I would eat street food every day. But I would give my body a few days to adjust to the new environment. And once you’re ready to hit the street market, just go to places where you’ll see more people waiting at the stall. This means that you’ll get some good food here. Or if you can’t find such a place, just ask someone, they will help you…

Indian people are friendly but they are a bit shy

If your skin color is white get used to getting stared at a lot. Don’t feel offended though, people are not trying to be rude they are just curious. I’ve even experienced people hanging around me and staring in the local market and it tuned out they just wanted to make sure I’m not getting ripped off.

People will stare for different reasons, so you better get used to it. You are in India after, all and should get used to their way of doing things. If you ever wondered how does it feel like to be a celebrity, you’ll get the chance to experience that if you’re a white foreigner traveling around India. Talking about things you should get used to…

Get used to the lack of personal space

The concept of personal space isn’t really a thing in India. And I couldn’t blame them for that. India has 5 times more people than the US squeezed in an area three times smaller! Get used to getting squashed when using public transport and when walking around some of the busy street markets. But that’s not all.

Related Post